Diabetes and Humor: A Preliminary Investigation

Pharmacist-Provided Diabetes Education and Management in a Diverse, Medically Underserved Population

AbstractDiabetes can take a tremendous toll on physical and psychological health. Given the growing evidence of the benefits of humor, this study examined the association between diabetes and humor. The sample consisted of 249 participants: 72.3% with type 1 diabetes, 70.3% female, 89.5% Caucasian, and 70.9% college educated. Participants completed the Humor Styles Questionnaire (HSQ) and were compared with HSQ norms. On the affiliative humor scale, the diabetes group did not differ from the norm (P >0.05), nor did those with type 1 diabetes (P >0.05). Scores of those with type 2 diabetes were lower than the norm (P <0.05). On the self-enhancing humor scale, the diabetes group did not differ from the norm (P >0.05), nor did the subgroups with type 1 diabetes (P >0.05) or type 2 diabetes (P >0.05). The diabetes group was lower than the norm on aggressive humor (P <0.01), as were the subgroups with type 1 diabetes (P <0.01) and type 2 diabetes (P <0.05). The diabetes group was higher than the norm on self-defeating humor (P <0.01), as were the subgroups with type 1 diabetes (P <0.01) and type 2 diabetes (P <0.01). Results suggest that people with either type of diabetes are more inclined toward self-enhancing humor, are less inclined toward aggressive humor, and score higher on self-defeating humor, and those with type 1 diabetes are also inclined toward affiliative humor. Results are discussed relative to the sample being comprised of individuals with good glycemic control (mean A1C 7.06 ± 1.39%). This study offers a preliminary comparison of humor among people with diabetes versus those in a healthy norm group without diabetes.© 2020 by the American Diabetes Association

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